Monthly Archives: 2월 2017

Enric Miralles

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Enric Miralles

The Scottish Parliament Building committee room ceiling.

Born
(1955-02-12)12 February 1955
Barcelona

Died
3 July 2000(2000-07-03) (aged 45)
Sant Feliu de Codines, Province of Barcelona

Nationality
Spain

Occupation
Architect

Awards
Stirling Prize (2005)
Madrid City Prize (1993)
National Prize of Spanish Architecture (1995)
Golden Lion (1996)

Buildings
Scottish Parliament Building
Igualada Cemetery

Igualada Cemetery

Santa Caterina Market (Video on YouTube)

Exterior view of the Scottish Parliament Building in Edinburgh

Debating chamber of the Scottish Parliament

Enric Miralles Moya (12 February 1955 – 3 July 2000) was a Spanish architect. He graduated from the Barcelona School of Architecture (ETSAB) at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC) in 1978. After establishing his reputation with a number of collaborations with his first wife Carme Pinós, the couple separated in 1991. He later married fellow architect Benedetta Tagliabue, and the two practiced together as EMBT Architects. Miralles’ magnum opus and his largest project, the new Scottish Parliament Building, was unfinished at the time of his death.

Contents

1 Life
2 Architecture
3 Academia
4 Work

4.1 Buildings
4.2 Projects
4.3 Furniture

5 Awards
6 References
7 Bibliography
8 External links

Life[edit]
In 1978, he completed his examinations at the Escola Tècnica Superior d’Arquitectura (ETSAB) in Barcelona. From 1973 to 1978 he worked in the architect’s office of Albert Viaplana and Helio Piñón.[1] Whilst there—among other things—he was involved in the construction of the Plaça dels Països Catalans, the forecourt for the Estació de Sants. In 1984 after several architectural competition awards, he formed his own office in Barcelona with his first wife Carme Pinós, which they led together until 1991. Within the rising Spanish architecture scene of the late 1980s following the death of Francisco Franco, their unusual buildings attracted international attention. As a result, they received numerous commissions from Spain and overseas. After their separation, Miralles and Pinós continued to work in separate offices.
In 1993 Enric Miralles formed a new practice with his second wife, the Italian architect Benedetta Tagliabue, under the name “EMBT Architects”. She resumed the practice under his name after his death. The most important projects; the Scottish Parliament Building in Edinburgh and the multistoried bui

Serve the People

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For the Norwegian communist political organization, see Serve the People (Norway).

The slogan displayed at Sun Yat-sen University.

“Serve the People” or “Service for the People” (Chinese: 为人民服务; pinyin: wèi rénmín fúwù) is a political slogan which first appeared in Mao-era China. It originates from the title of a speech by Mao Zedong, delivered on September 8, 1944. The slogan was also widely used in the United States by students and youth during the Asian American movement of the late 1960s and 1970s.[citation needed] The slogan was very popular due to the strong Maoist influence on the New Left, considerably amongst the Red Guard Party, the Black Panther Party, and the Yellow Brotherhood of West Los Angeles.[citation needed]

Contents

1 Origins
2 Role during the Cultural Revolution
3 Roles in modern society

3.1 Ceremonial role
3.2 Cultural role

4 See also
5 References
6 External links

Origins[edit]
Mao Zedong wrote this speech to commemorate the death of a PLA Soldier, Zhang Side, a participant in the Long March who died in the collapse of a kiln. In the speech he quoted a phrase written by the famous Han Dynasty historian Sima Qian, “Though death befalls all men alike, it may be heavy as Mount Tai or light as a feather.” (“人固有一死,或重于泰山,或轻于鸿毛。”). Mao continued: “To die for the people is weightier than Mount Tai, but to work for the fascists and die for the exploiters and oppressors is lighter than a feather. Comrade Zhang Side died for the people, and his death is indeed weightier than Mount Tai.”
The concept of “Serving the People”, together with other slogans such as “Never benefit oneself, always benefit others” and “Tireless struggle” became core principles of the Communist Party of China
Role during the Cultural Revolution[edit]
During the Cultural Revolution, the speech was widely read. Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai was frequently seen wearing a pin emblazoned with the slogan “Serve the People” next to a portrait of Mao Zedong.
Roles in modern society[edit]
Ceremonial role[edit]
Although less often used in China today, the phrase still plays some important ceremonial roles. It is inscribed on the screen wall facing the front entrance of the Zhongnanhai compound, which houses the headquarters of the Central People’s Government and the Communist Party of China.
During inspection of troops in the People’s Liberation Army, the following ceremonial exchange is carried out:

Inspecting of
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Charmoille, Haute-Saône

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Charmoille

Charmoille

Location within Bourgogne-Franche-Comté region 

Charmoille

Coordinates: 47°39′51″N 6°06′30″E / 47.6642°N 6.1083°E / 47.6642; 6.1083Coordinates: 47°39′51″N 6°06′30″E / 47.6642°N 6.1083°E / 47.6642; 6.1083

Country
France

Region
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté

Department
Haute-Saône

Arrondissement
Vesoul

Canton
Vesoul-Ouest

Area1
5.04 km2 (1.95 sq mi)

Population (2006)2
429

 • Density
85/km2 (220/sq mi)

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

 • Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

INSEE/Postal code
70136 / 70000

Elevation
233–294 m (764–965 ft)

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Charmoille is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté in eastern France.
See also[edit]

Communes of the Haute-Saône department

References[edit]

INSEE (English)

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Charmoille (Haute-Saône).

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Communes of the Haute-Saône department

Abelcourt
Aboncourt-Gesincourt
Achey
Adelans-et-le-Val-de-Bithaine
Aillevans
Aillevillers-et-Lyaumont
Ailloncourt
Ainvelle
Aisey-et-Richecourt
Alaincourt
Amage
Amance
Ambiévillers
Amblans-et-Velotte
Amoncourt
Amont-et-Effreney
Anchenoncourt-et-Chazel
Ancier
Andelarre
Andelarrot
Andornay
Angirey
Anjeux
Apremont
Arbecey
Arc-lès-Gray
Argillières
Aroz
Arpenans
Arsans
Athesans-Étroitefontaine
Attricourt
Augicourt
Aulx-lès-Cromary
Autet
Authoison
Autoreille
Autrey-lès-Cerre
Autrey-lès-Gray
Autrey-le-Vay
Auvet-et-la-Chapelotte
Auxon
Avrigney-Virey
Les Aynans
Baignes
Bard-lès-Pesmes
Barges
La Barre
La Basse-Vaivre
Bassigney
Les Bâties
Battrans
Baudoncourt
Baulay
Bay
Beaujeu-Saint-Vallier-Pierrejux-et-Quitteur
Beaumotte-Aubertans
Beaumotte-lès-Pin
Belfahy
Belmont
Belonchamp
Belverne
Besnans
Betaucourt
Betoncourt-lès-Brotte
Betoncourt-Saint-Pancras
Betoncourt-sur-Mance
Beulotte-Saint-Laurent
Beveuge
Blondefontaine
Bonboillon
Bonnevent-Velloreille
Borey
Bougey
Bougnon
Bouhans-et-Feurg
Bouhans-lès-Lure
Bouhans-lès-Montbozon
Bouligney
Boulot
Boult
Bourbévelle
Bourguignon-lès-Conflans
Bourguignon-lès-la-Charité
Bourguignon-lès-Morey
Boursières
Bousseraucour
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Gail Dubinbaum

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Gail Dubinbaum (born 1957) is an American operatic coloratura mezzo-soprano and co-founder and Creative Director of the Phoenix Metropolitan Opera.
Career[edit]
A native of Phoenix, Arizona,[1] Dubinbaum first studied with her mother, Ruth Dubinbaum, and then with operatic mezzo-soprano Herta Glaz. She also had a close association with Elisabeth Schwarzkopf.[2]
As befits a background so balanced between operatic and concert singing, Dubinbaum has been equally at home on the opera stage and concert platform since winning the Western Region Metropolitan Opera National Auditions in 1981.[3] Her operatic career, with a focus on works by Rossini and Mozart, has included appearances in productions at various major houses across the United States, ranging from the Metropolitan and Boston Lyric opera companies on the East Coast to the Portland Opera on the West, with appearances in Texas, Michigan, and Arizona in between. Internationally, she has sung with major companies in Israel, Austria, and Canada.[4] Her concert appearances have ranged equally widely: in addition to performances at several US music festivals, she has performed with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and New York Philharmonic, the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Cleveland Orchestra, and the Israel Philharmonic. Conductors with whom she has worked include the likes of Kurt Masur, Michael Tilson Thomas, Carlo Maria Giulini, and Leonard Bernstein;[2] James Levine presided over her appearances on television in the popular series In Performance at the White House and Live from the Met and in the Met Centennial Gala.[5] In 2007, Dubinbaum and her husband, conductor John Massaro, founded the Phoenix Metropolitan Opera, of which she is Creative Director. The company began with a single production of Puccini’s La Boheme but planned to expand to two productions for the 2008-2009 season.[6] The company also planned educational programs for children and young singers.[1] Besides her involvement with the Phoenix company, Dubinbaum maintains a private studio at which she teaches voice in Phoenix.[2]
References[edit]

^ a b Willoby, Shannon, “Gail Dubinbaum: Bringing Opera to Life,” North Valley magazine, May 29, 2008, accessed October 21, 2009
^ a b c Biographical sketch on Phoenix Opera Internet site, accessed October 21, 2009
^ List of Metropolitan Opera National Council Winners
^ Playbill Arts Internet site, accessed October 21, 2009
^ Biographical sketch on Los Angeles Je

Kim Moon-saeng

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This is a Korean name; the family name is Kim.
Kim Moon-saeng(Korean: 김문생, born 1 January 1961) is a South Korean animator, director and screenwriter.

Contents

1 Biography
2 Wonderful Days
3 References
4 External links

Biography[edit]
Kim is one of the best-known commercial directors in Korea.[citation needed] His experience has been focused on special effects with animation film for over 15 years. During this period, he has directed more than 200 TV commercials including products like Fanta (Buzz 2-D & 3-D complex animation: awarded gold medal at the 27th Creative Award USA, Korean Broadcasting Commercial Award 1988, Seoul Int’l Creative Animation Festival Award 1996, Pinnacle finalist 1997). From 1998, he has worked with Hong Kong-based international advertising agencies such as Oglivy & Mather and JWT. He also serves as a professor at the Kaywon Art School, teaching film design.[1]
Wonderful Days[edit]
In 2003, Kim created the post-apocalyptic animated film, Wonderful Days (aka Sky Blue, in the US and UK), his first feature film so far. It tells the story of an ethnic group of people known as Diggers who attempt to destroy the last, polluting city on Earth.
References[edit]

^ Kim Moon-saeng and Wonderful Days, animatekafestival.org, archived from the original on 2007-07-14 

External links[edit]

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 61802337
ISNI: 0000 0000 7999 0721
SUDOC: 182161293
BNF: cb146223056 (data)

This Korean biographical article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Harlan (disambiguation)

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Harlan is a given name and a surname. Harlan may also refer to:

Contents

1 Places

1.1 United States
1.2 Moon

2 Other uses

Places[edit]
United States[edit]

Harlan, Indiana, an unincorporated census-designated place
Harlan, Iowa, a city
Harlan, Kansas, an unincorporated community
Harlan, Kentucky, a city
Harlan, Oregon, an unincorporated community
Harlan County, Kentucky
Harlan County, Nebraska
Harlan Township, Fayette County, Iowa
Harlan Township, Decatur County, Kansas
Harlan Township, Warren County, Ohio

Moon[edit]

Harlan (crater)

Other uses[edit]

Harlan (company), full name Harlan Sprague Dawley Inc., suppliers of animals and other services to laboratories
Harlan Estate, California cult wine producer
Harlan Community Academy High School, Chicago, Illinois
Harlan Hall, a historic opera house in Marshall, Illinois
Harlan – In the Shadow of Jew Süss, a 2008 documentary film about Nazi filmmaker Veit Harlan

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Harlan.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Erling Evensen

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Olympic medal record

Men’s cross country skiing

1948 St. Moritz
4 x 10 km

Erling Evensen (April 29, 1914 – July 31, 1998) was a Norwegian cross-country skier who competed during the 1940s. He won a bronze medal in the 4 x 10 km relay at the 1948 Winter Olympics in St. Moritz. Evensen also finished 15th in the 18 km event at those same games.
External links[edit]

18 km results – 1948 Winter Olympics
http://www.sports-reference.com/olympics/athletes/ev/erling-evensen-1.html

This biographical article relating to Norwegian cross-country skiing is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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This article about a Norwegian Winter Olympic medalist is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Lochmodocerus antennatus

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Lochmodocerus antennatus

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Arthropoda

Class:
Insecta

Order:
Coleoptera

Suborder:
Polyphaga

Family:
Cerambycidae

Genus:
Lochmodocerus

Species:
L. antennatus

Binomial name

Lochmodocerus antennatus
Burne, 1984

Lochmodocerus antennatus is a species of beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and the only species in the genus Lochmodocerus. It was described by Burne in 1984.[1]
References[edit]

^ Biolib.cz – Lochmodocerus antennatus. Retrieved on 8 September 2014.

This Lamiini article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Vortex (Bond and Larkin novel)

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Vortex

First edition cover

Author
Larry Bond, Patrick Larkin

Cover artist
Peter Thorpe (design/illustration)

Country
United States

Language
English

Genre
Thriller, war novel

Publisher
Little, Brown and Warner Books

Publication date

June 1991

Media type
Print (Paperback)

Pages
909 pp (paperback edition)

ISBN
0-446-51566-3 (first edition, hardback) & ISBN 0-446-36304-9 (Paperback edition)

OCLC
23286496

Dewey Decimal

813/.54 20

LC Class
PS3552.O59725 V6 1991

Vortex is a 1991 war novel by Larry Bond and Patrick Larkin. Set during the final years of apartheid in South Africa, Vortex follows the assassination of a reformist National Party president and his cabinet by the African National Congress, as well as a subsequent seizure of power by far-right Afrikaners. The plot unfolds through a series of intertwining accounts narrated through several characters. It was a commercial success, receiving generally positive reviews.
A Vortex audiobook, presented by David Purdham, was released via Simon Schuster Audio in August 1991.

Contents

1 Background
2 Plot
3 Characters

3.1 South Africans
3.2 Americans
3.3 Cubans

4 Reception
5 References

Background[edit]
In an increasingly tense, hypothetical South Africa, the ruling National Party and newly elected State President Frederick Haymans seek to negotiate diplomatic reforms with the African National Congress (ANC). However, beneath the surface progress has been slow, since the ANC refuses to disarm its militant wing or cease planning guerrilla operations, and Haymans remains solidly opposed to a universal franchise.
Plot[edit]
South African paratroopers raid an African National Congress base in Zimbabwe. The raiders uncover plans for “Broken Covenant,” an ANC plot to assassinate the government as they travel back to Pretoria from Cape Town aboard the Blue Train for the legislature’s summer recess. The raid comes at a time when the government’s talks with the ANC are approaching a major breakthrough; the ANC decides to abort Broken Covenant, not knowing that the South Africans already have information on the plan. Seeing an opportunity to take power with the leadership eliminated, Internal Security Minister Karl Vorster deliberately excuses himself from the trip. A courier assigned to transmit the abort signal to the ambush team is also killed in a hit-and-run.
With Haymans and his Cabinet killed in the attack, Vorster assumes the presidency and declares marti

St. John’s Episcopal Church (Montgomery, Alabama)

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St. John’s Episcopal Church

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

St. John’s Episcopal Church in 2009.

Show map of Alabama

Show map of the US

Location
113 Madison Ave., Montgomery, Alabama

Coordinates
32°22′47″N 86°18′26″W / 32.37972°N 86.30722°W / 32.37972; -86.30722Coordinates: 32°22′47″N 86°18′26″W / 32.37972°N 86.30722°W / 32.37972; -86.30722

Area
less than one acre

Built
1854-55

Architect
Frank Wills; Henry Dudley

Architectural style
Gothic Revival

NRHP Reference #

75000326[1]
[2]

Added to NRHP
February 24, 1975[1][2]

St. John’s Episcopal Church is a historic Gothic Revival church in Montgomery, Alabama, United States. It was designed by the New York City architectural firm of Frank Wills and Henry Dudley. The church was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on 24 February 1975.[1]
History[edit]
St. John’s parish was organized in 1834 and by 1837 the parishioners had moved into a modest brick sanctuary on the corner of Perry and Jefferson Streets. After little more than a decade, the church needed to expand after the state capital moved to Montgomery and a rise in cotton production swelled the region’s population. The current building was completed in 1855, in the same city block as the old, but facing Madison Street.[3]

An interior view toward the altar in 1934.

St. John’s Episcopal Church was involved in several historic events around the time of the American Civil War. It hosted the Secession Convention of Southern Churches in 1861, which had helped fuel the South’s secession movement. St. John’s was also the church attended by the Confederate President, Jefferson Davis, when Montgomery was the capital of the Confederate States of America. The church was forced to close its doors in 1865 under Union Army orders, it would reopen for services in 1866.[3]
The old building from the 1830s was torn down in 1869 and its bricks were used to construct an addition to the main structure. The building was expanded again in 1906. The church hosted many Army recruits from the nearby “Camp Sheridan” tent city during World War I, until an outbreak of the Spanish Flu forced the church to temporarily close its doors.
In May 1925, a bronze plaque in honor of President Jefferson Davis was dedicated.[4] John Trotwood Moore, the State Librarian and Archivist of Tennessee, was invited to give a speech.[4]
The church was renovated in