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Serve the People

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For the Norwegian communist political organization, see Serve the People (Norway).

The slogan displayed at Sun Yat-sen University.

“Serve the People” or “Service for the People” (Chinese: 为人民服务; pinyin: wèi rénmín fúwù) is a political slogan which first appeared in Mao-era China. It originates from the title of a speech by Mao Zedong, delivered on September 8, 1944. The slogan was also widely used in the United States by students and youth during the Asian American movement of the late 1960s and 1970s.[citation needed] The slogan was very popular due to the strong Maoist influence on the New Left, considerably amongst the Red Guard Party, the Black Panther Party, and the Yellow Brotherhood of West Los Angeles.[citation needed]

Contents

1 Origins
2 Role during the Cultural Revolution
3 Roles in modern society

3.1 Ceremonial role
3.2 Cultural role

4 See also
5 References
6 External links

Origins[edit]
Mao Zedong wrote this speech to commemorate the death of a PLA Soldier, Zhang Side, a participant in the Long March who died in the collapse of a kiln. In the speech he quoted a phrase written by the famous Han Dynasty historian Sima Qian, “Though death befalls all men alike, it may be heavy as Mount Tai or light as a feather.” (“人固有一死,或重于泰山,或轻于鸿毛。”). Mao continued: “To die for the people is weightier than Mount Tai, but to work for the fascists and die for the exploiters and oppressors is lighter than a feather. Comrade Zhang Side died for the people, and his death is indeed weightier than Mount Tai.”
The concept of “Serving the People”, together with other slogans such as “Never benefit oneself, always benefit others” and “Tireless struggle” became core principles of the Communist Party of China
Role during the Cultural Revolution[edit]
During the Cultural Revolution, the speech was widely read. Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai was frequently seen wearing a pin emblazoned with the slogan “Serve the People” next to a portrait of Mao Zedong.
Roles in modern society[edit]
Ceremonial role[edit]
Although less often used in China today, the phrase still plays some important ceremonial roles. It is inscribed on the screen wall facing the front entrance of the Zhongnanhai compound, which houses the headquarters of the Central People’s Government and the Communist Party of China.
During inspection of troops in the People’s Liberation Army, the following ceremonial exchange is carried out:

Inspecting of
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Charmoille, Haute-Saône

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Charmoille

Charmoille

Location within Bourgogne-Franche-Comté region 

Charmoille

Coordinates: 47°39′51″N 6°06′30″E / 47.6642°N 6.1083°E / 47.6642; 6.1083Coordinates: 47°39′51″N 6°06′30″E / 47.6642°N 6.1083°E / 47.6642; 6.1083

Country
France

Region
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté

Department
Haute-Saône

Arrondissement
Vesoul

Canton
Vesoul-Ouest

Area1
5.04 km2 (1.95 sq mi)

Population (2006)2
429

 • Density
85/km2 (220/sq mi)

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

 • Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

INSEE/Postal code
70136 / 70000

Elevation
233–294 m (764–965 ft)

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Charmoille is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté in eastern France.
See also[edit]

Communes of the Haute-Saône department

References[edit]

INSEE (English)

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Charmoille (Haute-Saône).

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Communes of the Haute-Saône department

Abelcourt
Aboncourt-Gesincourt
Achey
Adelans-et-le-Val-de-Bithaine
Aillevans
Aillevillers-et-Lyaumont
Ailloncourt
Ainvelle
Aisey-et-Richecourt
Alaincourt
Amage
Amance
Ambiévillers
Amblans-et-Velotte
Amoncourt
Amont-et-Effreney
Anchenoncourt-et-Chazel
Ancier
Andelarre
Andelarrot
Andornay
Angirey
Anjeux
Apremont
Arbecey
Arc-lès-Gray
Argillières
Aroz
Arpenans
Arsans
Athesans-Étroitefontaine
Attricourt
Augicourt
Aulx-lès-Cromary
Autet
Authoison
Autoreille
Autrey-lès-Cerre
Autrey-lès-Gray
Autrey-le-Vay
Auvet-et-la-Chapelotte
Auxon
Avrigney-Virey
Les Aynans
Baignes
Bard-lès-Pesmes
Barges
La Barre
La Basse-Vaivre
Bassigney
Les Bâties
Battrans
Baudoncourt
Baulay
Bay
Beaujeu-Saint-Vallier-Pierrejux-et-Quitteur
Beaumotte-Aubertans
Beaumotte-lès-Pin
Belfahy
Belmont
Belonchamp
Belverne
Besnans
Betaucourt
Betoncourt-lès-Brotte
Betoncourt-Saint-Pancras
Betoncourt-sur-Mance
Beulotte-Saint-Laurent
Beveuge
Blondefontaine
Bonboillon
Bonnevent-Velloreille
Borey
Bougey
Bougnon
Bouhans-et-Feurg
Bouhans-lès-Lure
Bouhans-lès-Montbozon
Bouligney
Boulot
Boult
Bourbévelle
Bourguignon-lès-Conflans
Bourguignon-lès-la-Charité
Bourguignon-lès-Morey
Boursières
Bousseraucour
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Kim Moon-saeng

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This is a Korean name; the family name is Kim.
Kim Moon-saeng(Korean: 김문생, born 1 January 1961) is a South Korean animator, director and screenwriter.

Contents

1 Biography
2 Wonderful Days
3 References
4 External links

Biography[edit]
Kim is one of the best-known commercial directors in Korea.[citation needed] His experience has been focused on special effects with animation film for over 15 years. During this period, he has directed more than 200 TV commercials including products like Fanta (Buzz 2-D & 3-D complex animation: awarded gold medal at the 27th Creative Award USA, Korean Broadcasting Commercial Award 1988, Seoul Int’l Creative Animation Festival Award 1996, Pinnacle finalist 1997). From 1998, he has worked with Hong Kong-based international advertising agencies such as Oglivy & Mather and JWT. He also serves as a professor at the Kaywon Art School, teaching film design.[1]
Wonderful Days[edit]
In 2003, Kim created the post-apocalyptic animated film, Wonderful Days (aka Sky Blue, in the US and UK), his first feature film so far. It tells the story of an ethnic group of people known as Diggers who attempt to destroy the last, polluting city on Earth.
References[edit]

^ Kim Moon-saeng and Wonderful Days, animatekafestival.org, archived from the original on 2007-07-14 

External links[edit]

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 61802337
ISNI: 0000 0000 7999 0721
SUDOC: 182161293
BNF: cb146223056 (data)

This Korean biographical article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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The Nightmare

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For the 2015 film of the same name, see The Nightmare (2015 film).

The Nightmare. Oil on canvas, 101.6 x 127 mm. Detroit Institute of Arts

The Nightmare is a 1781 oil painting by Anglo-Swiss artist Henry Fuseli. It shows a woman in deep sleep with her arms thrown below her, in a room filled with white light, and with a demonic and apelike incubus crouched on her chest.
The painting’s dream like and haunting erotic evocation of infatuation and obsession was a huge popular success. After its first exhibition, at the 1782 Royal Academy of London, critics and patrons reacted with horrified fascination and the work became widely popular, to the extent that it was parodied in political satire, and an engraved version was widely distributed. In response, Fuseli produced at least three other versions.
Interpretations vary. The canvas seems to portray simultaneously a dreaming woman and the content of her nightmare. The incubus and horse’s head refer to contemporary belief and folklore about nightmares, but have been ascribed more specific meanings by some theorists.[1] Contemporary critics were taken aback by the overt sexuality of the painting, since interpreted by some scholars as anticipating Jungian ideas about the unconscious.

Contents

1 Description
2 Exhibition
3 Interpretation
4 Legacy

4.1 Influence on literature
4.2 In the twentieth and twenty-first centuries

5 References
6 Notes
7 Further reading
8 External links

Description[edit]
The Nightmare simultaneously offers both the image of a dream—by indicating the effect of the nightmare on the woman—and a dream image—in symbolically portraying the sleeping vision.[2] It depicts a sleeping woman draped over the end of a bed with her head hanging down, exposing her long neck. She is surmounted by an incubus that peers out at the viewer. The sleeper seems lifeless, and, lying on her back, takes a position then believed to encourage nightmares.[3] Her brilliant coloration is set against the darker reds, yellows, and ochres of the background; Fuseli used a chiaroscuro effect to create strong contrasts between light and shade. The interior is contemporary and fashionable, and contains a small table on which rests a mirror, phial, and book. The room is hung with red velvet curtains which drape behind the bed. Emerging from a parting in the curtain is the head of a horse with bold, featureless eyes.
For contemporary viewers, The Nightmare invoked the relationship of the incubus and the horse (m

Carlos Raúl Contín

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Carlos Raúl Contín

Governor of Entre Ríos Province

In office
October 12, 1963 – June 28, 1966

Preceded by
Leandro Ruiz Moreno

Succeeded by
Ricardo Favre

Provincial Deputy of Entre Ríos Province

In office
May 1, 1958 – March 29, 1962

Personal details

Born
November 4, 1915
Nogoyá, Entre Ríos Province

Died
August 8, 1991(1991-08-08) (aged 75)
Buenos Aires

Political party
Radical Civic Union

Spouse(s)
Nélida Biaggioni

Alma mater
National University of the Littoral

Profession
Biochemist

Carlos Raúl Contín (November 4, 1915 — August 8, 1991) was an Argentine politician and leader of the centrist Radical Civic Union (UCR).
Life and times[edit]
Born in Nogoyá, Contín enrolled in the National University of the Littoral and became a biochemist by profession. He married Nelida Biaggioni, a native of the city of Gálvez, Santa Fe Province, in 1946. Contín campaigned from his youth for the UCR, representing the party as alderman of his city, Nogoyá, at the age of 30 years. A leader of the UCR’s “Unionist” wing (the faction most opposed to populist leader Juan Perón), he became prominent in the Entre Rios UCR when this faction eclipsed the pro-Perón “Renewal” wing. Following Perón’s 1955 overthrow, and with a schism in the UCR during their 1956 convention, he joined the more conservative People’s Radical Civic Union (UCRP). The rival Intransigent Radical Civic Union (UCRI) won the 1958 elections with the exiled Perón’s endorsement, though Contín was elected to the Lower House of Congress for Entre Ríos Province; he was reelected in 1960, but lost his seat when President Arturo Frondizi was overthrown in 1962.
Ahead of new elections in 1963, Contín was nominated as the UCRP candidate for governor of his province in a ticket with the Mayor of Concepción del Uruguay, Teodoro Marco. The duo defeated the UCRI, securing 113,436 votes (33%), versus the latter’s 94,660 (28%).[1] The UCR returned to power in Entre Ríos after 20 years, having last governed the important province from 1914 to 1943.
His government had no majority in the provincial House of Representatives, but was able to enact significant initiatives largely due to the skill of the UCRP caucus leader, César Jaroslavsky. In this way, Contín was able to resume the stalled construction of the Hernandarias Subfluvial Tunnel that would link the city of Paraná to Santa Fe (June 1, 1964), to create the Ministry of Social Policy, the School

George Thomas (footballer, born 1857)

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George Thomas

Personal information

Date of birth
1857

Place of birth
Wales

National team

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

1885
Wales
2
(0)

George Thomas (1857 – ?) was a Welsh international footballer. He was part of the Wales national football team, playing 2 matches. He played his first match on 14 March 1885 against England and his last match on 23 March 1885 against Scotland.[1]
See also[edit]

List of Wales international footballers (alphabetical)

References[edit]

^ “Wales player database 1872 to 2013”. eu-football.info. Retrieved 30 April 2016. 

This biographical article related to Welsh association football is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Robert M. Thorndike

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Robert M. Thorndike (born March 2, 1943) is an American psychology professor known for several definitive textbooks on research procedures and psychometrics.
He earned his B.A. in psychology from Wesleyan University in 1965 and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1970. He has taught at Western Washington University since 1970.
He is a Fellow in the American Psychological Association, Division 5. In 1994 he was one of 52 signatories on “Mainstream Science on Intelligence,[1]” an editorial written by Linda Gottfredson and published in the Wall Street Journal, which declared the consensus of the signing scholars on issues related to race and intelligence following the publication of the book The Bell Curve.
He’s the son of the American psychologist and scholar Robert L. Thorndike[2][3] and the grandson of the psychologist and scholar Edward Lee Thorndike.
Selected bibliography[edit]

Cross-Cultural Research Methods. New York: Wiley-Interscience, 1973. pp. 351. (with R.W. Brislin and W.J. Lonner).
Correlational Procedures for Research. New York: Gardner Press, 1978. pp. 340.
Data Collection and Analysis: Basic Statistics. New York: Gardner Press, 1982. pp. 478.
A Century of ability testing. Chicago: The Riverside Publishing Company, 1990. pp. 164. (with D. Lohman).
Measurement and evaluation in psychology and education (7th ed.). (2005). New York: Macmillan. pp. 608.
Thorndike, R. M. & Dinnel, D. L. (2001). Introductory statistics for psychology and education. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

References[edit]

^ Gottfredson, Linda (December 13, 1994). Mainstream Science on Intelligence. Wall Street Journal, p A18.
^ Lee J. Cronbach, « Robert L. Thorndike (1910–1990): Obituary », American Psychologist, vol. 47(10), Oct 1992, p. 1237, APA.
^ Joan Cook, « R. L. Thorndike, Psychologist, 79; Developed Scholastic-Ability Tests » (Obituary), New York Times, 25 septembre 1990, Template:Lire en ligne

External links[edit]

Robert M. Thorndike website and bio via WWU

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 113710801
LCCN: n81015485
ISNI: 0000 0001 1006 062X
SUDOC: 060327693

This biography of an American psychologist is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Park View

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Park View may refer to
Places[edit]

Park View, Iowa
Park View, West Virginia
Park View Road, an English football ground
Park View, Washington, D.C., a neighborhood
Park View Estate in Mynydd-Bach, South Wales
Park View Heights, Indiana

Education[edit]

Park View Primary School, Singapore
Park View School, Chester-le-Street, County Durham, England
Park View School, West Green, London, England
Park View School, the former name of Rockwood Academy, Birmingham, England
Park View High School (Loudoun County, Virginia)
Park View High School (South Hill, Virginia)
Park View Education Centre, Nova Scotia, Canada
Park View School (Washington, D.C.), a NRHP listed site

See also[edit]

Parkview (disambiguation)

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Park View.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Lau Kar-wing

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This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (February 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Lau Kar-wing

Chinese name
劉家榮 (traditional)

Chinese name
刘家荣 (simplified)

Pinyin
Liú Jiārong (Mandarin)

Jyutping
Lau4 Gaa1 Wing4 (Cantonese)

Born
1944 (age 72–73)
Jiangmen, Guangdong, China

Other name(s)
Liu Chia-yung
Bruce Lau

Occupation
Actor, director, action choreographer

Years active
1964 – present

Children
Lau Wing-kin

Parents
Lau Cham (father)

Ancestry
Xinhui, Guangdong, China

Awards

Hong Kong Film Awards

Best Action Choreography
1991 Once Upon a Time in China

Lau Kar Wing (simplified Chinese: 刘家荣; traditional Chinese: 劉家榮; pinyin: Liú Jiārong, Liu Jiayung; born 1944) is a Hong Kong martial arts film director, action choreographer and actor.[1]

Contents

1 Background
2 Film career
3 Personal life
4 Selected filmography

4.1 As director
4.2 As martial arts choreographer
4.3 As actor

5 References
6 External links

Background[edit]
Born in the Xinhui District of Jiangmen in Guangdong, China, Lau Kar-wing was the fourth child of Lau Cham (劉湛), a martial arts master who studied under Lam Sai-wing, pupil of the legendary Chinese folk hero, Wong Fei-hung.
Lau began learning kung fu in his early teens. He actually began learning at his father’s school, in secret. However, when his older brother Lau Kar-Leung saw this, he began teaching Kar-wing himself.
Film career[edit]
Before becoming famous, Lau worked as an extra and choreographer on the black & white Wong Fei-hung films, which starred Kwan Tak-hing as the titular hero. Lau was given his start working under his father and brother in these films, and followed his brother to become a stuntman and assistant choreographer.
In the 1960s he became one of the Shaw Brothers Studio’s main action choreographers, working with many directors on films such as King Boxer (1972). Lau evolved to become a director in the late 1970s. By this time he was already an accomplished actor and action choreographer outside of Shaw Brothers.
In the 1970s, Lau formed a partnership with Sammo Hung and Karl Maka. The trio started their own film production company in 1978, Gar Bo Motion Picture Compa

Voith Gravita

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Voith Gravita family

Gravita 10BB

Type and origin

Power type
Diesel-hydraulic

Builder
Voith Turbo

Specifications

UIC class
5B “B”
5C “C”
10BB, 15BB, 20BB “B-B” [1]

Gauge
1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in)
(Standard gauge)

Length
5B ~10 m (32 ft 10 in)
5C ~11 m (36 ft 1 in)
10BB ~15.7 m (51 ft 6 in)
15BB ~16.9 m (55 ft 5 in)
20BB ~18.5 m (60 ft 8 in)[1]

Loco weight
5B 40–45 t (39.4–44.3 long tons; 44.1–49.6 short tons)
5C 60–67.5 t (59.1–66.4 long tons; 66.1–74.4 short tons)
10BB 76–100 t (75–98 long tons; 84–110 short tons)
15BB 80–90 t (79–89 long tons; 88–99 short tons)
20BB 84–88 t (83–87 long tons; 93–97 short tons)[1]

Fuel type
Diesel fuel

Fuel capacity
5B 2,000 L (440 imp gal; 530 US gal)
5C 2,500 L (550 imp gal; 660 US gal)
10BB 3,300 L (730 imp gal; 870 US gal)
15BB 5,000 L (1,100 imp gal; 1,300 US gal)
20BB 6,000 L (1,300 imp gal; 1,600 US gal)[1]

Prime mover
MTU 4000[2]

Transmission
Hydraulic

Performance figures

Maximum speed
5B, 5C 80 km/h (50 mph)
10BB, 15BB 100 km/h (62 mph)
20BB 120 km/h (75 mph)[1]

Power output
5B 400 kW (540 hp)
5C 700 kW (940 hp)
10BB 1,200 kW (1,600 hp)
15BB 1,800 kW (2,400 hp)
20BB 2,200 kW (3,000 hp)[1]

Tractive effort

Maximum tractive effort at μ=0.42:
5B 165–185 kN (37,000–42,000 lbf)
5C 247–289 kN (56,000–65,000 lbf)
10BB 313–412 kN (70,000–93,000 lbf)
15BB 330–317 kN (74,000–71,000 lbf)
20BB 346–363 kN (78,000–82,000 lbf)
[1]
Practical starting tractive effort at μ=0.33:
5B 129–146 kN (29,000–33,000 lbf)
5C 194–219 kN (44,000–49,000 lbf)
10BB 246–337 kN (55,000–76,000 lbf)
15BB 259–291 kN (58,000–65,000 lbf)
20BB 272–285 kN (61,000–64,000 lbf)[1]

Career

Official name
Gravita

Locale
Germany

Inside drivers cabin of Voith Gravita loco

The Voith Gravita locomotives are a new family of diesel-hydraulic locomotives built by Voith Turbo Lokomotivtechnik GmbH & Co. KG.. Available in a range of configurations from 4 to 6 axles, they are designed for shunting and