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Community Renewal Tax Relief Act of 2000

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Community Renewal Tax Relief Act of 2000

Full title
To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide for community revitalization and a 2-year extension of medical saving accounts, and for other purposes.

Introduced in
106th United States Congress

Introduced on
December 14, 2000

Sponsored by
Rep. William Reynolds Archer, Jr. (R-TX)

Number of Co-Sponsors
1

Citations

Public Law
Incorporated into Pub.L. 106–554

Legislative history

Introduced in the House as H.R. 5662 by Rep. William Reynolds Archer, Jr. (R-TX) on December 14, 2000
Committee consideration by: United States House Committee on Ways and Means

The Community Renewal Tax Relief Act of 2000 (H.R. 5662) is a bill that was introduced into the United States House of Representatives during the 106th United States Congress. The Act was eventually passed as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2001.[1]
The Community Renewal Tax Relief Act of 2000 is intended to improve development in economically distressed areas of the United States. The law offers “tax incentives for businesses to locate and hire residents in urban and rural areas that have not experienced recent economic expansion.”[2] Both rural and urban areas are eligible. Three primary means were used: renewal communities, empowerment zones, and community development entities.[2] The bill also created the New Markets Tax Credit Program, which has been renewed several times and is still in effect.[3]

Contents

1 Provisions of the bill
2 Congressional Research Service summary
3 Procedural history
4 History
5 See also
6 Notes/References
7 External links

Provisions of the bill[edit]
One provision of the Community Renewal Tax Relief Act of 2000 was the creation of 40 “renewal communities”.[2] Renewal communities would receive special tax breaks designed to encourage economic growth by generating business investment and job opportunities. Requirements to being designated a renewal community included having a high rate of poverty and high unemployment rate (compared to rates nationwide).[2] The communities must have under 200,000 people in them, but can be any physical size.[2] Local and state governments must be involved with a community gaining this designation. They are required to participate by making their own commitments to taking action to reduce economic burdens on employers and businesses in the area, as well as taking steps to encourage economic growth.[2] If a community is successful in becoming

Federation of European Biochemical Societies

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The Federation of the European Biochemical Societies, frequently abbreviated FEBS is an international scientific society promoting activities in biochemistry, molecular biology and molecular biophysics in Europe. Since it was founded in 1964 it has grown to include almost 40,000 members from 36 member societies and 7 associated societies from 43 countries [1].

Contents

1 Present activities
2 Sir Hans Krebs Lecture and Medal
3 Datta Lectureship and Medal
4 Theodor Bücher Lecture and Medal
5 Journals
6 See also
7 References
8 External links

Present activities[edit]
FEBS sponsors advanced courses for Ph.D.-students and postdocs, arranges conferences and awards fellowships, awards and medals. FEBS distributes surplus scientific equipment in the poorer member countries as a part of the Scientific Apparatus Recycling Scheme (SARS). In addition, FEBS gives young scientists from Eastern and Central Europe a possibility to visit and work in labs in Western Europe. FEBS collaborates with related scientific societies such as the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO), European Life Scientist Organisation (ELSO), and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). FEBS is also founding member of the Initiative for Science in Europe.
Sir Hans Krebs Lecture and Medal[edit]
The Sir Hans Krebs Medal is awarded annually for outstanding achievements in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology or related sciences. It was endowed by the Lord Rank Centre for Research and named after the German-born British biochemist Hans Adolf Krebs, well known for identifying the urea and citric acid cycles. The awardee receives a silver medal and presents one of the plenary lectures at the FEBS Congress.[1]
Datta Lectureship and Medal[edit]
The Datta Lectureship award is awarded for outstanding achievements in the field of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology or related sciences. The award is endowed by capital gifts from Elsevier Science Publishers and is named after S. Prakash Datta, the first Managing Editor of FEBS Letters (1968–1985) and Treasurer of FEBS. The awardee, who should normally be from a FEBS country, receives a medal provided by Elsevier Science Publishers and presents one of the plenary lectures at the FEBS Congress.[1]
Theodor Bücher Lecture and Medal[edit]
The Theodor Bücher Lecture and Medal is awarded for outstanding achievements in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology or related sciences. It was endowed by a capital gift from Frau Ingrid Bücher to the Ge

Indecs Content Model

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“Indecs” redirects here. For the journal title abbreviated to INDECS, see Interdisciplinary Description of Complex Systems.

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indecs[1] (an acronym of “interoperability of data in e-commerce systems”; written in lower case) was a project partly funded by the European Community Info 2000 initiative and by several organisations representing the music, rights, text publishing, authors, library and other sectors in 1998-2000, which has since been used in a number of metadata activities. A final report and related documents were published; the indecs Metadata Framework document[2] is a concise summary.
indecs provided an analysis of the requirements for metadata for e-commerce of content (intellectual property) in the network environment, focusing on semantic interoperability. Semantic interoperability deals with the question of how one computer system knows what the terms from another computer system mean (e.g. if A says “owner” and B says “owner”, are they referring to the same thing? If A says “released” and B says “disseminated”, do they mean different things?).
indecs was built from a simple generic model of commerce (the “model of making”): a model of the life cycle of any kind of content from conception to the final physical or digital copies. The top-level model is summarised as “people make stuff; people use stuff; and (for commerce to take place) people make deals about the stuff”. If secure machine-to-machine management of commerce is to be possible, the stuff, the people and the deals must all be securely identified and described in standardised ways that machines can interpret and use. Central to the analysis is the assumption that it is possible to produce a generic mechanism to handle complex metadata for all different types of content. So, for example, instead of treating sound carriers, books, videos and photographs as fundamentally different things with different (if similar) characteristics, they are all recognised as creations with different values of the same higher-level attributes, whose metadata can be supported in a common environment.

Contents

1 Framework
2 Use
3 Intellectual property rights
4 Mapping of terms
5 References

Framework[edit]
The indecs analysis supports interoperabili