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Alan Skirton

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Alan Skirton

Personal information

Full name
Alan Frederick Graham Skirton

Date of birth
(1939-01-23) 23 January 1939 (age 78)

Place of birth
Bath, England

Playing position
Winger

Youth career

West Twerton Youth Club

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

1956–1960
Bath City
144
(44)

1960–1966
Arsenal
145
(53)

1966–1968
Blackpool
77
(25)

1968–1971
Bristol City
78
(14)

1971–1972
Torquay United
38
(7)

1972
Durban City

1972–1974
Weymouth

Total

338
(99)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Alan Frederick Graham Skirton (born 23 January 1939) is an English former footballer.

Contents

1 Playing career
2 Post-retirement
3 Honours
4 References
5 Further reading
6 External links

Playing career[edit]
Skirton started out as a player with West Twerton Youth Club in his home city of Bath before joining Bristol City as an amateur. However, they did not retain him and he then joined hometown club Bath City in the Southern League. He soon attracted the attention of several other clubs. Arsenal won the fight for his signature, signing him in January 1959 for £5,000.[1] Soon after signing, however, Skirton contracted pleurisy and pneumonia and was out of action for eighteen months.
He finally made his debut for Arsenal against Burnley on 20 August 1960.[2] He played sixteen games that season, sharing the right wing position with Danny Clapton. He supplanted Clapton altogether the following season, and scored nineteen goals in 40 matches, making him the club’s top scorer for that season.[3]
After the signing of Johnny MacLeod in the summer of 1962, Skirton was switched to the left wing, where he played for the next four seasons, albeit irregularly, as Arsenal manager Billy Wright preferred to field only one out-and-out winger. The emergence of the young George Armstrong also meant Skirton’s place was under threat, and Skirton shared duties with Armstrong for his final two seasons at the club.
Nevertheless, Skirton still averaged twenty appearances a season, and made history by becoming the first Arsenal player to score a goal in a European match at Highbury, against Danish club, Stævnet on 22 October 1963. However, Wright’s successor, Bertie Mee, was looking to youth as the means to success for the Gunners. After playing the first two matches of the 1966–67 season, Skirton signed for Blackpool on 12 September 1966 for £65,000. He had played 154 matches for Arsenal, sco

Algarve Football Association

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Associação de Futebol do Algarve

Abbreviation
AF Algarve

Formation
1922

Purpose
District Football Association

Headquarters
Complexo Desportivo de Faro

Location

8000 – 788 Faro
Portugal

President

António Coelho Matosa

Website
afalgarve.pt

Estádio Algarve

The Associação de Futebol do Algarve (Algarve Football Association) is one of the 22 District Football Associations that are affiliated to the Portuguese Football Federation. The AF Algarve administers lower tier football in the district of Faro.[1]

Contents

1 Background
2 Competitions
3 Notable clubs affiliated to AF Algarve
4 Current Divisions – 2015–16 Season

4.1 Division One (1ª divisão)
4.2 Division Two (2ª divisão)
4.3 Taça do Algarve

5 Former participants
6 District championships

6.1 Historic champions
6.2 Recent divisional winners

7 List of member clubs
8 References
9 External links

Background[edit]
Associação de Futebol do Algarve, commonly referred to as AF Algarve, is the governing body for football in the district of Faro. The Football Association is based in Penha in Faro, close to Piscinas Municipais de Faro (Faro Municipal Swimming Pool) and Complexo Desportivo da Penha (Sports Complex of Penha). The Association’s President is António Coelho Matosa.[2]
The organisation was established on 22 January 1922 following an initial meeting on 15 October 1921 at the Ginásio Clube Farense by representatives from a number of Algarve clubs including Sporting Clube Farense, Sport Lisboa e Faro, Boxing Futebol Clube (Portimão), Sporting Clube Olhanense, Lusitano Futebol Clube, Glória Futebol Clube, Portimonense Sporting Clube, Sport Club União, Sport Club “Os Leões Portimonenses” and Esperança Futebol Clube. The two previous attempts to establish a Football Association ended in failure.[3]
Competitions[edit]
Algarve clubs compete in the three national levels of the Portuguese football league system in competitions run by the Portuguese League for Professional Football (Primeira Liga and Liga de Honra) and Portuguese Football Federation (Campeonato Nacional de Seniores). In 2009 SC Olhanense were promoted to the Primeira Liga after winning the Liga de Honra.[4] No club from the Algarve had played in the Primeira Liga since 2002.[5]
Below the Terceira Divisão (Portuguese Third Division) the competitions are organised at a district level (known in Portuguese as Distritais) with each District Association organising its competitions according

Christian Bilingual University of Congo

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Christian Bilingual University of Congo

Université Chrétienne Bilingue du Congo (UCBC)

Motto
Love, Work, Faithfulness

Established
2006

Rector
David Kasali

Dean
Honore Bunduki

Academic staff

David Kasali, Kaswera Kasali, Honoré Bunduki Kwany, Innocent Bora Uzima, Noé Kasali, Mashauri Malonga

Administrative staff

David Kasali, Honoré Bunduki Kwany, Daniel Masumbuko Kasereka, Bethany Erickson, Justin Hubbard, Chelsie Frank, Osée Mbusa Mbailwako, Meredith Knuckles, Grant Haun, Kaza Bendela, Charles Tsongo

Students
300

Location
Beni, Democratic Republic of Congo

Nickname
UCBC

Affiliations
Congo Initiative

Website
ucbc.org

UCBC (French: Université Chretienne Bilingue du Congo, English: Christian Bilingual University of Congo) is a Christian bilingual university in development in the town of Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Contents

1 Organization
2 Description of Educational Activities

2.1 Preparatory Year
2.2 Faculty Departments

3 References
4 External links

Organization[edit]
The development of UCBC is supported the Congo Initiative (CI-UCBC), a Christian charity in Wisconsin.[1]
Description of Educational Activities[edit]
Preparatory Year[edit]
CI/UCBC aligns Preparatory year with its academic program. The curriculum focuses on teaching English as means of communication and medium of instruction; computer skills are taught to bring students into the modern world of computer literacy for research and communication; general courses, work methodology and CI-UCBC philosophy and values are also taught to prepare students for studies at UCBC.
Faculty Departments[edit]

Future Building Plans

Faculty of Economic Sciences:

Jaʿār munitions factory explosion

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Jaʿār factory explosion

Location
Ammunition factory, near Jaʿār, Abyan Governorate

Coordinates
13°13′23″N 45°18′20″E / 13.22306°N 45.30556°E / 13.22306; 45.30556

Date
March 28, 2011 (2011-03-28) (UTC+3)

Attack type

explosion

Deaths
150[1][2]

Non-fatal injuries

45

Suspected perpetrators

al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula break-in;[3] accidental triggering

A munitions factory explosion took place on March 28, 2011, in the village of Khanfar, Abyan, bordering the town of Jaʿār in Abyan Governorate, southern Yemen.

Contents

1 Background
2 Incident

2.1 Casualties

3 Reaction
4 References

Background[edit]
The explosion occurred during a period of high insurgency from rebel forces and Islamist movements in Southern Yemen, in addition to an ongoing government crackdown on al-Qaeda. Following clashes near the town of Jaʿār, the Yemeni Air Force bombed the area earlier in the day of the explosion.[4] During the same day, President of Yemen Ali Abdullah Saleh announced an end to government concessions given amidst ongoing protests in the country, although it was not immediately known whether the explosion was connected to the protests.[5][6]
Incident[edit]

Approximate location of explosion, Jaʿār, Yemen

The blast occurred a day after around 30 armed al-Qaeda militants raided the “7th of October” ammunition plant in the town, stealing cases of ammunition and leaving gunpowder exposed at the site;[3][7] militants took over another nearby munitions factory in Khanfar. According to Al Jazeera, the initial fire was reportedly triggered by a local resident dropping a lit cigarette while inside the looted factory,[8][9] as some were checking the site for weapons,[5] which soon led to an explosion. It was loud enough to be heard roughly 15 km (9.3 mi) from the factory, and left many charred bodies at the scene.
Casualties[edit]
Estimates of the number of casualties were not immediately clear. According to the BBC and AFP, 78 people died in the explosion,[10] while The Independent said that “more than 100” people died,[11] and CNN said that “[a]t least 121” were killed.[12] By the day after the incident, the death toll had been increased to 150.[13] An accurate death toll was reportedly difficult to establish, due to the condition of the bodies, many of which were badly burned.[10] 45 people were reported injured,[12] 27 of whom were, according to officials at a local hospital,
일산오피

Enoshima Station

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This article relies largely or entirely upon a single source. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources. (December 2016)

Enoshima Station
江ノ島駅

Location
1-4-7, Katase-Kaigan, Fujisawa, Kanagawa
(神奈川県藤沢市片瀬海岸1-4-7)
Japan

Coordinates
35°18′40″N 139°29′15″E / 35.31111°N 139.48750°E / 35.31111; 139.48750Coordinates: 35°18′40″N 139°29′15″E / 35.31111°N 139.48750°E / 35.31111; 139.48750

Operated by
Enoshima Electric Railway

Line(s)
Enoshima Electric Railway Line

Connections
Bus stop

History

Opened
1902

Previous names
Katase (until 1929)

Enoshima Station (江ノ島駅, Enoshima-eki?) is a railway station on the Enoshima Electric Railway (Enoden) located in Fujisawa, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. It is 3.3 kilometers from the terminus of the Enoden at Fujisawa Station. The Enoden tracks run on the vehicular road between this station and Koshigoe Station.

Contents

1 History
2 Station layout

2.1 Platforms

3 Adjacent stations
4 References
5 External links

History[edit]
Enoshima Station was opened on September 1, 1902, as Katase Station (片瀬駅, Katase-eki?). It was renamed to its present name in 1929. The current station building was rebuilt in 1999.
Station layout[edit]
Enoshima station has two opposed side platforms serving two ground-level tracks. for bi-directional traffic. The tracks are connected to the station building via a level crossing.
Platforms[edit]

1
■ Enoshima Electric Railway Line
Fujisawa

2
■ Enoshima Electric Railway Line
Shichirigahama ・ Hase ・ Kamakura

Adjacent stations[edit]

«
Service
»

Enoshima Electric Railway Line

Koshigoe
Local
Shōnankaigankōen

References[edit]

Harris, Ken; Clarke, Jackie (2008). Jane’s World Railways 2008-2009. Jane’s Information Group. ISBN 0-7106-2861-7. [page needed]

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Enoshima Station.

Enoden home page (Japanese)

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Stations of the Enoshima Electric Railway

Kamakura
Wadazuka
Yuigahama
Hase
Gokurakuji
Inamuragasaki
Shichirigahama
Kamakurakōkōmae
Koshigoe
Enoshima
Shōnankaigankōen
Kugenuma
Yanagikōji
Ishigami
Fujisawa

This Kanagawa Prefecture railroad station-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Necropolis of Is Loccis-Santus

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Necropolis of Is Loccis-Santus

Necropolis of Is Loccis-Santus

Shown within Italy

Location
San Giovanni Suergiu, Sardinia, Italy

Region
Sardinia

Coordinates
39°7′10.56″N 8°29′34.8″E / 39.1196000°N 8.493000°E / 39.1196000; 8.493000Coordinates: 39°7′10.56″N 8°29′34.8″E / 39.1196000°N 8.493000°E / 39.1196000; 8.493000

Type
Necropolis

History

Cultures
Pre-Nuragic Sardinia

Site notes

Management
Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici per le province di Cagliari e Oristano

Public access
Yes

The necropolis of Is Loccis-Santus is an archaeological site located in the municipality of San Giovanni Suergiu, Sardinia. Dated to the 3rd millennium BC and used until the early centuries of the 2nd millennium BC, consists of thirteen Domus de janas. The artefacts found inside the tombs, mostly ceramics and other grave goods, are attributable to the Ozieri culture, Abealzu-Filigosa culture, Monte Claro culture, the Bell Beaker and Bonnanaro culture and are now exposed in the Villa Sulcis museum of Carbonia.[1]
On top of the hill where is located the necropolis there is a monotower nuraghe, built in the Nuragic era, and some buildings dating back to World War II.[2]
Notes[edit]

^ Monumenti aperti – Necropoli di Is Loccis-Santus
^ Il portale sardo-Necropoli di Is Loccis-Santus

Bibliography[edit]

Enrico Atzeni, La “cultura del vaso campaniforme” nella necropoli di Locci-Santus (San Giovanni Suergiu), in Carbonia e il Sulcis: archeologia e territorio, Oristano, S’Alvure, 1995, pp. 119-143;
Giovanni Lilliu, La civiltà dei Sardi dal paleolitico all’età dei nuraghi, Torino, Nuova ERI, 1988, pp. 161, 276, 432;
Giovanni Lilliu, Preistoria e protostoria del Sulcis, in Carbonia e il Sulcis: archeologia e territorio, a cura di V. Santoni, Oristano, S’Alvure, 1995, pp. 13-50.

Coasta

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Coasta may refer to several villages in Romania:

Coasta, a village in Șieu-Odorhei Commune, Bistriţa-Năsăud County
Coasta, a village in Bonţida Commune, Cluj County
Coasta, a village in Golești, Vâlcea
Coasta, a village in Păușești-Măglași Commune, Vâlcea County
Coasta, an alternative rock band from Long Island, New York

See also[edit]

Coasta River (disambiguation)
Costești (disambiguation)
Costișa, name of several villages in Romania
Costinești, name of two villages in Romania

This disambiguation page lists articles about distinct geographical locations with the same name.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

강남오피

Elachyophtalma goliathina

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Elachyophtalma goliathina

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Arthropoda

Class:
Insecta

Order:
Lepidoptera

Family:
Bombycidae

Genus:
Elachyophtalma

Species:
E. goliathina

Binomial name

Elachyophtalma goliathina
Rothschild, 1920

Elachyophtalma goliathina is a moth in the Bombycidae family. It was described by Rothschild in 1920. It is found in New Guinea.[1]
The wingspan is 56–60 mm. Adults are Dark chocolate-brown with an indistinct darker zig-zag antemedian line and two darker serpentine zigzag postmedian lines. The hindwings have a rufous tinge, and the abdominal margin has whitish lines on the edge.
References[edit]

^ On the genus Elachyophthalma Feld

Natural History Museum Lepidoptera generic names catalog

This article related to the Bombycidae family is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Luís Geraldes

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Luís Geraldes

Born
Luís Pereira Geraldes
(1957-05-15) May 15, 1957 (age 59)
Lisbon, Portugal

Education

Institute of Art and Design, Lisbon
Monash University, Melbourne

Known for
Painting, Sculpture, Ceramic Murals, Print Making, Drawing

Luís Pereira Geraldes (born May 15, 1957), is a contemporary metaphysical Portuguese artist.[1]
He is more widely known for his oil painting[citation needed] although he has produced a vast amount of sculpture, drawings and large Ceramic murals. His art can be labelled as metaphysical/mysticism symbolism or magnetic spirituality. He has also produced a lengthy number of ceramic murals in Sydney and Melbourne, Australia. Which are on public display at Trafalgar Street metro station in the suburb of Petersham, and Audley street in Marrickville, Sydney

Contents

1 Biography
2 Oil on canvas
3 References
4 External links

Biography[edit]
Geraldes was born in 1957 and went to the African country of Angola when he was about 3 years of age. He spent most of his childhood and adolescent years there but in 1975 he had to flee the country as a refugee due to the terrifying civil war. His long stay in Angola seems to have affected his style of art and he did indeed start painting when he was a boy.
He migrated to Australia in 1985. He became an Australian citizen in 1987 and has taught art and design at Footscray Institute of TAFE from 1988 to 1990 and at RMIT (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology) from 1991 to 1995. From 1995, he was a lecturer at the Central Gippsland Institute Art Department.
He now paints full-time and regularly travels between Europe and Australia. His paintings have been selling throughout the world and auctions houses, particularly at Christie’s Art Auctions in London.
Oil on canvas[edit]
Geraldes is more famous for his oil painting. His style has dramatically changed over the years and we can see how Australian art has influenced his style.
His early interest in western and eastern esotericism and spirituality can also be seen as a prime factor in his subject matter, painting geometric patterns involving cosmic imagery and symbolism of universal significance. In some of his works the use of the chakra colors can be seen as well as a diagrammatic language of cosmic journeys.. In his book, Visions of the Esoteric Power, he asserts his belief that “art, science, and the spiritual do not exist in isolation”.
He is exploring the 3rd dimension of human beings in relation to the spirit
분당오피

Robe de style

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A robe de style wedding dress, 1922. A sketch for a pannier to wear underneath is in the lower right-hand corner.

The robe de style describes a style of dress popular in the 1920s as an alternative to the straight-cut chemise dress.
The style was characterised by its full skirts. The bodice could be fitted, or straight-cut in the chemise manner, with a dropped waist, but it was the full skirt that denoted the robe de style. Sometimes the fullness was supported with petticoats, panniers, or hoops.
The robe de style was a signature design of the couturier Jeanne Lanvin.[1] Other couture houses known for their versions of the robe de style included Boué Soeurs, Callot Soeurs, and Lucile.[2]
References[edit]

^ Merceron, Dean, Lanvin, (London, 2007) (ISBN 978-0847829538)
^ Webber Kerstein, Melinda (23 November 2015). “Robe de Style”. Clothing and Fashion: American Fashion from Head to Toe. ABC-CLIO. p. 263. Retrieved 17 August 2016 – via Google Books. 

External links[edit]

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/haut/ho_C.I.56.49.9.htm
http://collections.vam.ac.uk/objectid/O15643